The Difference Time Can Make on the High Desert

The 'bend ' of the Deschutes River

The ‘bend ‘ of the Deschutes River

That life can change as sudden as the blink of an eye is never lost on me. When I started writing my 2013 NANO project the weather here on the high desert was hanging on to mild days, & sunny skies, making my view out my window from where I write quite stunning for Fall in Oregon. Even for the high desert. Fall which just happens to my favorite time of year because it represents change. At least to my way of thinking it does. The photo above I took about a month ago.  in late October as I walked the river trail outlining my new story -line.- A personal favorite place to wander on foot for a mental wander.

Locally we were beginning to think that any idea we might have that this was going to be a harsh winter were slim.

Then Mother Nature  surprised us last week as our night-time temps began dipping into single digits, and our daytime highs in the mid 20’s. Fahrenheit that is.  Old Man Winter is making an appearance after all.

My NANO?  As of this day; #25, taking most of the weekend off,  I am delighted that I am at 43,668 words towards my goal of  50,000.
I also realized while star-gazing my story won’t be told in the 50,000 word commitment I made.  I am quite okay with that.

Feeling: Astonished how things can change, so much, so fast.

Photo: What an awesome pic from James Dustin Parsons of ExtremeOregon.net. He snapped this Wednesday evening while snowshoeing on out on the closed Cascade Lakes Highway. "That yellow glow, from what I have learned, is light pollution from Portland," he wrote. "It is in every night shot I take in that direction but I think it looks cool." We agree! Do you?

FYI only ~

The gorgeous photo above is not mine, but I think it so breathtaking and representative of the beauty we are blessed with here on the desert in the winter.  I want to share it.

The highway in the photo is the beautifully scenic Cascade Lakes Highway.  This awesome pic is by James Dustin Parsons of ExtremeOregon.net. He snapped this last Wednesday evening while snowshoeing on out on the closed highway.

Mr Parson’s shared this; ” That yellow glow, from what I have learned is light pollution from Portland,” he wrote. “It is in every night shot I take in that direction, but I think it looks cool.”

I think so too James~

This 66-mile historic highway was selected by Scenic America as one of the nation’s ten most important byways. It became a National Scenic Byway in 1998 because of its outstanding scenic, natural and recreational qualities. It was also dedicated as a National Forest Scenic Byway in 1989. The byway follows a journey of water through a volcanic landscape accentuated by 14 alpine lakes. Reflected in many lakes are scenic views of Mt. Bachelor, Broken Top, and South Sister. The byway is a great way of getting in touch with cultures and communities of Central Oregon‘s high desert.
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3 thoughts on “The Difference Time Can Make on the High Desert

  1. Boy, am I in good company. Someone laughed when I said there is a scent to snow.

    Have a lovely Thanksgiving. In Canada we celebrate it the second Monday in October but you can invite me over. I like turkey anytime. 😛

You are most welcome to share your thoughts, comments, and/or complaints here. Know though complaints are only handled on the 2nd Tuesday of the week.~ The Management

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